Seismic Zones of INDIA


Earthquake – prone areas of the country have been identified on the basis of scientific inputs relating to seismicity -earthquakes occurred in the past and tectonic setup of the region. Based on these inputs, Bureau of Indian Standards [IS 1893 (Part I):2002], has grouped the country into four seismic zones, viz. Zone II, III, IV and V. Of these, Zone V is seismically the most active region, while zone II is the least. Broadly, Zone – V comprises entire northeastern India, parts of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Rann of Kutch in Gujarat, part of North Bihar and Andaman & Nicobar Islands. Zone – IV covers remaining parts of Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh, National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, Sikkim, Northern Parts of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and West Bengal, parts of Gujarat and small portions of Maharashtra near the west coast and Rajasthan. Zone – III comprises Kerala, Goa, Lakshadweep islands, remaining parts of Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat and West Bengal, Parts of Punjab, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Maharashtra, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Tamilnadu and Karnataka. Zone – II covers remaining parts of country.

A list of important cities falling in various seismic zones, has also been prepared by BIS and is given below:-

Town State/UT Zone Town State/UT Zone
Agra Utter Pradesh III Chitradurga Karnataka II
Ahmedabad Gujarat III Coimbatore Tamil nadu III
Ajmer Rajasthan II Cuddalore Tamil Nadu III
Allahabad Utter Pradesh II Cuttack Orissa III
Almora Uttrakhand IV Darbhanga Bihar V
Ambala Haryana IV Darjeeling West Bengal IV
Amritsar Punjab IV Dharwad Karnataka III
Asansol West Bengal III Dehradun Uttrakhand IV
Aurangabad Maharastha II Dharmpuri Tamil Nadu III
Baharich Utter Pradesh IV Delhi Delhi IV
Bangalore Karnataka II Durgapur West Bengal III
Barauni Bihar IV Gangtok Sikkim IV
Bareilly Utter Pradesh III Guwahati Assam V
Belgaum Karnataka III Goa Goa III
Bhatinda Punjab III Gulbarga Karnataka II
Bhilai Chattiagarh II Gaya Bihar III
Bhopal Madhya Pradesh II Gorakhpur Utter Pradesh IV
Bhubaneswar Orissa III Hyderabad Andhra Pradesh II
Bhuj Gujarat V Imphal Manipur V
Bijapur Karnataka III Jabalpur Madhya Pradesh III
Bikaner Rajasthan III Jaipur Rajasthan II
Bokaro Jharkhand III Jamshedpur Jharkhand II
Bulandshahr Utter Pradesh IV Jhansi Utter Pradesh II
Burdwan West Bengal III Jodhpur Rajasthan II
Cailcut Kerala III Jorhat Assam V
Chandigarh Chandigarh IV Kakrapara Gujarat III
Chennai Tamil Nadu III Kalapakkam Tamil Nadu III
Kanchipuram Tamil Nadu III Pondicherry Pondicherry II
Kanpur Utter Pradesh III Pune Maharastha III
Karwar Karnataka III Raipur Chattisgarh II
Kohima Nagaland V Rajkot Gujarat III
Kolkata West Bengal III Ranchi Chattisgarh II
Kota Rajasthan II Roorkee Uttrakhand IV
Kurnool Andhra Pradesh II Rourkela Orissa II
Lucknow Utter Pradesh III Sadiya Assam V
Ludhiyana Punjab IV Salem Tamil Nadu III
Madurai Tamil Nadu II Simla Himanchal Pradesh IV
Mandi Himanchal Pradesh V Sironj Madhya Pradesh II
Mangalore Karnataka III Solapur Maharastha III
Monghyr Bihar IV Srinagar Jammu & Kashmir V
Moradabad Utter Pradesh IV Surat Gujarat III
Mumbai Maharastha III Tarapur Maharastha III
Mysore Karnataka II Tezpur Assam V
Nagpur Maharastha II Thane Maharastha III
Nagarjunasagar Andhra Pradesh II Thanjavur Tamil Nadu II
Nainital Uttrakhand IV Thiruvananthapuram Kerala III
Nasik Maharastha III Tiruchirappali Tamil Nadu II
Nellore Andhra Pradesh III Tiruvennamalai Tamil Nadu III
Osmanabad Maharastha III Udaipur Rajasthan II
Panjim Goa III Vadodara Gujarat III
Patiala Punjab III Varanasi Utter Pradesh III
Patna Bihar IV Vellore Andhra Pradesh III
Pilibhit Uttrakhand IV Vijayawada Andhra Pradesh III
      Vishakhapatnam Andhra Pradesh II

Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) has published criterion for construction of earthquake resistant structures. Buildings are now being made earthquake resistant.

BIS has prepared guidelines for retrofitting in existing structures. A list of code books on construction practices of buildings and structures, to minimize the earthquake losses, is available. In addition to this, Housing and Urban Development Corporation (HUDCO) & Building Materials & Technology Promotion Council (BMTPC) have also published guidelines and brochures for construction and retrofitting of buildings. These guidelines are in wide circulation amongst the public and the administrative authorities responsible for the design and construction of earthquake resistant structures in earthquake prone areas.

Loss of life and damage of property due to earthquakes could be considerably reduced through proper planning and implementation of pre- and post-disaster preparedness and management strategies by respective State and Central Government agencies in a coordinated manner following the above mentioned guidelines. These studies involving preparation of geological, geomorphologic and land use maps followed by drilling, geological logging, standard penetration test and geophysical studies to demarcate the zones of least to most damage prone areas within the urban areas so as to helps the respective town and country planning agencies to formulate perspective planning within the overall earthquake impact minimization efforts. Based on the above steps it is mandatory for all infrastructure/building/ development agencies (Public and Private) to design appropriate earthquake resistant building plans based on the relevant BIS Codes and other guidelines of BMTPC, HUDCO and NDMA for across the country.

National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA), Ministry of Earth Sciences and other state Disaster Management Authorities, have also taken up various initiatives to educate and enhance awareness amongst general public and school children on the general aspects of earthquakes, their impacts and measures to mitigate losses caused by them. A National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) is also functional under the general superintendence, direction and control of the NDMA for the purpose of specialized response to natural and man-made disasters.

NOW ALL OF YOU KNOW, WHY BANGALORE IS SAFE?

 

Services provided by the Housing Society Resident Welfare Association (RWA) not to become expensive under GST;


 There is no change made to services provided by the Housing Society (RWA) to its members in the GST regime.

There are some press reports that services provided by a Housing Society [Resident Welfare Association (RWA)] will become expensive under GST. These are completely unsubstantiated.

It may be mentioned that supply of service by RWA (unincorporated body or a registered non- profit entity) to its own members by way of reimbursement of charges or share of contribution up to an amount of five thousand rupees per month per member for providing services and goods for the common use of its members in a housing society or a residential complex are exempt from GST.

Further, if the aggregate turnover of such RWA is upto Rs.20 Lakh in a financial year, then such supplies would be exempted from GST even if charges per member are more than Rs. five thousand.

RWA shall be required to pay GST on monthly subscription/contribution charged from its members if such subscription is more than Rs. 5000 per member and the annual turnover of RWA by way of supplying of services and goods is also Rs. 20 lakhs or more. Under GST, the tax burden on RWAs will be lower for the reason that they would now be entitled to ITC in respect of taxes paid by them on capital goods (generators, water pumps, lawn furniture etc.), goods (taps, pipes, other sanitary/hardware fillings etc.) and input services such as repair and maintenance services. ITC of Central Excise and VAT paid on goods and capital goods was not available in the pre-GST period and these were a cost to the RWA.

Thus, there is no change made to services provided by the Housing Society (RWA) to its members in the GST era.

There is a misconception floating all around that the services provided by a Housing Society [Resident Welfare Association (RWA)] will become expensive post GST. But that’s just the myth.

Relaxation upto Rs. 20 lakh

If the aggregate turnover of such RWA is upto Rs.20 Lakh in a financial year, then such supplies would be exempted from GST even if charges per member are more than Rs. five thousand.

Entitlement of ITC with respect to capital goods & Input services

Unlike earlier, they would now be entitled to ITC in respect of taxes paid by them on capital goods (generators, water pumps, lawn furniture etc.), goods (taps, pipes, other sanitary/hardware fillings etc.) and input services such as repair and maintenance services. ITC of Central Excise and VAT paid on goods and capital goods, due to which the tax burden on RWAs will be lower.

Exemption from GST

Services provided by RWA (unincorporated body or a registered non- profit entity) to its own members by way of reimbursement of charges or share of contribution up to an amount of five thousand rupees per month per member for providing services and goods for the common use of its members in a housing society or a residential complex are exempt from GST.

Withdrawal of exemption

RWA shall be required to pay GST on monthly subscription/contribution charged from its members if such subscription is more than Rs. 5000 per member and the annual turnover of RWA by way of supplying of services and goods is also Rs. 20 lakhs or more.

GST rate beyond the threshold limit

RWAs supplying of services and goods aggregating more than Rs 20 lakhs per annum will attract 18 per cent GST.

 

The National Green Tribunal (NGT) today declared 100 meters from the edge of River Ganga as a ‘No-Development Zone’ in the stretch between Haridwar in Uttarakhand and Unnao in Uttar Pradesh.


There shall be no dumping of waste of any kind within 500 metres  from the edge of River Ganga,” said NGT.

The NGT also declared an environment compensation of ₹50,000 on anyone who dumps waste in River Ganga. UP and Uttarakhand were directed to formulate guidelines for religious activities on the ghats of Ganga or its tributaries.

NGT has formed a supervisory committee to oversee implementation of directions passed in its 543-page judgement and submit report to it.

BANGALORE – SMART CITY – GETS RS.2,219.32 CRORES


Bangalore-The Smart City will get funds for the development
The BBMP has drawn up several projects that would help the city stand on a par with other global cities and the work may start from the end of this year, if everything is NORMAL. (Politics)

Of the Rs 2,219.32 crore earmarked for the Smart City project, Centre and Karnataka will each contribute Rs 500 crore; the remaining will come through the PPP mode, and from other agencies like BBMP, BMTC and BMRCL.

NEW ROAD FROM MYSORE ROAD TO MAGADI ROAD – A BDA PROPOSAL


The Bangalore Development Authority (BDA) has finalised a project to construct a six-lane road which connects Mysuru and Magadi Roads through Kempegowda Layout and is expected to submit the proposal to the State Government soon and  the project might be completed in 18-24 months.

The six-lane road will be constructed from Mysuru Road located at one end of Kempegowda Layout to Magadi road. A portion of the road — around 10.7 km — will be taken up as an arterial road at an estimated cost of Rs 350-370 crore. This road will have two-lane service road on the both sides and around 320 acres of land may be required for the completion of this project.

The proposed road will put a curb on the entry of heavy vehicles into the city.

After the construction of the connecting road, two sides, along the road, will help take up business activities. For the purpose, about 250 acres of land has been identified in five different places. Information technology companies and industrials units will be established under the Public Private Participation (PPP) model.

RERA-DILUTION- A PRESS REPORT


The Real Estate (Regulation and Development) Act (RERA), which was notified on July 6 by the state cabinet and implemented on July 10, has now come in the line of fire from experts and home buyers showing reservations to the government’s notification and threatening to approach the Supreme Court over the issue.

MS Shankar, Convener, Fight for RERA (Karnataka Chapter), said, “The Act says all the projects that have not received the occupancy and completion certificates (OC/CC) shall come under the purview of RERA but Karnataka has excluded them with an explanation which goes against the spirit of the Act. Projects where development works have been completed and certificated by a ‘competent agency’, and where 60 percent of sale or lease is completed are excluded. There is no clarification given on who this ‘competent agency’ is. It is presumed it is builders, architects or engineers.”

According to the representatives of the group, by excluding projects where the sale deed of 60 per cent is completed, the rights available to consumers under RERA Act to complain about any structural defects within 5 years has been snatched away.

In addition, deviation on construction apart from the sanctioned plan, delays and non-issuance of occupancy and completion certificates for those projects which are excluded are not protected under RERA.

Members of Fight for RERA, the group that has threatened to approach the apex court against the way the federal rule has been twisted by various state governments, have alleged that the rules not only help private builders but also protect Bangalore Development Authority and Karnataka Housing Board that have failed to deliver on their schemes at various levels.

RERA-SOME ON GOING PROJECTS ARE BROUGHT UNDER RERA


All the development/apartment projects where works are still going on has been brought under the ambit of RERA.

The rules state that only those projects where all development works have been completed, and where sale and lease deeds of 60% of the apartments/houses/plots are executed, are exempted.

While the State Cabinet had approved the draft rules last week, confusion over what would constitute an ongoing project had persisted till the final notification. Government sources had indicated that projects, where 60% of the work was completed, would be exempted. However, the rules make it clear that the 60% clause will be applied only for sale and lease deeds, not for development works.

The rules exempt those layouts where streets, civic amenities sites and other services have been handed over to the local authority for maintenance. They also exempt apartment projects where common areas and facilities have been handed over to the registered association consisting of a majority of allottees. Projects where development works have been completed as per the Act and certificated by the competent agency, and where an application has been filed for the issue of completion certificate, are also exempt.

For those projects where partial occupancy certificate is obtained, the exemption is limited to the portion for which the certificate is obtained.